Utilizing three years of epidemiological data from medical missions in Cambodia to shape the mobile medical clinic formulary

  • Jeany Kim Jun Keck Graduate Institute School of Pharmacy http://orcid.org/0000-0003-4732-2675
  • Junia S. Koo Department of Pharmacy, University of California Los Angeles Medical Center, Los Angeles, California
  • Amy Y. Kang Department of Clinical Pharmacy, University of California San Francisco School of Pharmacy, San Francisco, California
  • Deborah B. Chien Department of Pharmacy, Desert Valley Hospital, Victorville, California
  • Albert Shim Department of Internal Medicine and Pediatrics, Cedars Sinai Medical Group, Los Angeles, California
  • Dale Knutson Department of Medical Missions, Mission to the World
  • Eda M. Kim Department of Family Practice, Care Here Clinic, Mission to the World, Lawrenceville, Georgia

Abstract

Objective:  The purpose of this project was to gather epidemiological data on common diseases and medications dispensed during medical mission teams to Cambodia to shape the mobile medical clinic formulary.

Methods:  Data for patients seen during week-long, mobile, medical clinics was collected in Cambodia during Septembers 2012 to 2014.  Patient’s gender, age, weight, blood pressure, glucose, pertinent laboratory values, diagnoses, and medications dispensed were collected.  Blood pressure and glucose were measured in patients 18 years and above.  Data collected onto paper intake forms were transferred onto spreadsheets without patient identifying information and analyzed for aggregate means, common diseases, and most dispensed medications.  This project received institutional review board approval.

Results:  A total of 1,015 patients were seen over three years.  Women made up 61.4% and the mean age was 41.8 years.   The most common diagnosis was gastrointestinal disorders  (22.9%), which included gastroesophageal reflux disease and intestinal parasites.  Next, 20.1% of patients had hypertension (BP>140/90), 18.0% had presbyopia, 15.4% had back and joint pain, followed by 8.8% with headache, including migraines.  Approximately 8.4% of patients had hyperglycemia (RPG >140 mg/dl).  Top five medications dispensed were acetaminophen, omeprazole, multivitamin, ibuprofen and metformin.   For hypertension, amlodipine and lisinopril were dispensed.

Conclusion:  Cambodia lacks systematic public health collection of epidemiological data for prevalence of diseases.  Hence, investigators collected and analyzed information from week-long mobile medical clinics over three years.  Proton-pump inhibitors and H. pylori lab tests are recommended for gastrointestinal disorders.  Acetaminophen and ibuprofen are recommended for pain.  Angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors and dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers are recommended over diuretics since patients are already dehydrated.  Metformin is recommended for diabetes.  Vitamins and supplements are recommended for malnourished patients.  Hemoglobin machine and urine test strips are suggested.  This information should help future teams decide what medications and laboratory tests are most beneficial on medical teams in Cambodia.

 

Author Biographies

Jeany Kim Jun, Keck Graduate Institute School of Pharmacy
Assistant Professor of Clinical and Administrative Sciences
Junia S. Koo, Department of Pharmacy, University of California Los Angeles Medical Center, Los Angeles, California
Staff Pharmacist at UCLA Medical Center
Amy Y. Kang, Department of Clinical Pharmacy, University of California San Francisco School of Pharmacy, San Francisco, California
Post-Graduate Year 1 Pharmacy Practice Resident
Deborah B. Chien, Department of Pharmacy, Desert Valley Hospital, Victorville, California
Per-Diem Pharmacist, Department of Pharmacy
Albert Shim, Department of Internal Medicine and Pediatrics, Cedars Sinai Medical Group, Los Angeles, California
Family Medicine and Pediatrics Physician, Department of Internal Medicine and Pediatrics
Dale Knutson, Department of Medical Missions, Mission to the World
Pediatrician, Medical Missionary with Mission to the World, Cambodia
Eda M. Kim, Department of Family Practice, Care Here Clinic, Mission to the World, Lawrenceville, Georgia
Family Practice Physician at Mission to the World

References

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Published
2017-03-09
How to Cite
JUN, Jeany Kim et al. Utilizing three years of epidemiological data from medical missions in Cambodia to shape the mobile medical clinic formulary. Christian Journal for Global Health, [S.l.], v. 4, n. 1, p. 13-23, mar. 2017. ISSN 2167-2415. Available at: <http://journal.cjgh.org/index.php/cjgh/article/view/156>. Date accessed: 20 july 2017. doi: https://doi.org/10.15566/cjgh.v4i1.156.

Keywords

Epidemiological data; Cambodia; Medical missions; Common diseases; Common medications; Mobile clinic formulary
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